II biannual workshop: Technological change, health, inequality and data for policy evaluation

Start Date: 
Thursday, February 24, 2022 - 14:00
End Date: 
Friday, February 25, 2022 - 17:00
Place: 
Torino, Collegio Carlo Alberto

Call for papers and posters


The LABORatorio Revelli – Center for Employment Studies is pleased to announce its second biannual workshop. The workshop stems from the LABORatorio’s twenty-year experience in the study of labor market dynamics and aims to promote the exchange of research ideas among the scientific community.
The workshop will propose two thematic sessions on “Technological change in the workplace during the fourth industrial revolution” and “Health and inequality”. Maria Savona (SPRU Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex UK and Department of Economics and Finance, Luiss University) and Giuseppe Costa (University of Torino) will give the keynote speeches.
A policy-oriented session (in Italian) on the use of models and data for the design and evaluation of employment policies will further enrich the program. This section is organized within the framework of the “Youth Employment PartnerSHIP project (https://yepartnership.carloalberto.org/) and will host a speech by Fabio Rapiti  National Statistical Office).
The workshop will host papers and posters presentations, split evenly on the two thematic sections.
Submissions by young researchers are particularly welcome. A 500 Euro prize in the name of Riccardo Revelli – a pioneer in the use of administrative data for labor market analysis – will be awarded to the best contribution (either poster or paper) by a young researcher.
Please submit extended abstracts or – preferably – full papers in pdf format to labor@laboratoriorevelli.it by December 31, 2021 indicating which thematic session you are applying for and if you prefer a paper or poster presentation; in case of overcrowding of accepted paper presentations, some will be randomly assigned to the poster session. Notifications about acceptance will be sent by early January, 2022. Participation is free of charge while travel expenses will not be covered.
The workshop will take place at Collegio Carlo Alberto, Torino. An on-line channel will be open for those not able to attend in presence.

 

Call for Section 1, 24 February 2022, afternoon


Technological change in the workplace during the Fourth Industrial Revolution 

The past few years have witnessed the rise in the development and adoption by firms of 4IR-related technologies, which include, among others, artificial intelligence, automation, and machine learning. The potential effects of these technologies on the economy and society are huge, and the labor market is likely to be particularly affected. 4IR-related technologies promise to drastically change the firms’ production processes as well as the organization of human resources within firms. While academic interest on these topics is increasing, relatively few studies have investigated the labor market consequences of 4IR technologies up to now from a firm-level or worker-level perspective. The use of firm-level, worker-level and linked employeremployee data offers unmatched opportunities to study the dynamics of technological change in the workplace, and allows answering important research questions. What is the impact of 4IR-related technologies on wages and employment? Are wages and employment outcomes different for low- and high-skilled workers and routine and non-routine jobs? How do rent-sharing dynamics differ across these types of jobs? In other words, is wage inequality increasing as the 4IR paradigm becomes more pervasive?


We welcome paper proposals on the relationships between 4IR and, among the others: 

  • wages and performance outcomes
  • industrial relations
  • other labor market institutions, including (but not limited to) employment protection
  • the consequences on the excluded, with a focus on long-term unemployment

Call for Section 2, 25 February 2022, afternoon


Health and inequality


Health inequality is the difference in health between different groups of people. It can include differences in life expectancy, differences in getting a particular disease or functional limitation, and differences in recovering due to unequal access to good quality care. These differences are the result of multiple mechanisms and factors, among which the inequalities in material and immaterial resources and opportunities that stem from the labor market play a crucial role. Disparities in education, income, employment protection, job quality and satisfaction, physical and psychological conditions, are just few of the many dimensions that can be related to unequal health. At a time when income and health inequalities across the world are widespread and often increasing, even due to the pandemic, the 2nd LABOR Workshop provides a forum where evidence relevant to the measurement and analysis of the relationship between inequalities that originate in the labor market and health – or viceversa - can be discussed and shared.
We welcome research based on sound empirical evidence, identification of causal relations and grounded in economics, social epidemiology, public health and health system studies and/or related areas and disciplines. 
A non-exhaustive list of themes the workshop welcomes is: 

  • Inequalities in the labor market and health: from work to health and back
  • COVID-19 and the new and old inequalities
  • Digitalization, robotization and health and inequality
  • The implication of longevity inequality for the equity of pension systems

Call for papers and posters


The LABORatorio Revelli – Center for Employment Studies is pleased to announce its second biannual workshop. The workshop stems from the LABORatorio’s twenty-year experience in the study of labor
market dynamics and aims to promote the exchange of research ideas among the scientific community.
The workshop will propose two thematic sessions on “Technological change in the workplace during the fourth industrial revolution” and “Health and inequality”. Maria Savona (SPRU Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex UK and Department of Economics and Finance, Luiss University) and Giuseppe Costa (University of Torino) will give the keynote speeches.
A policy-oriented session (in Italian) on the use of models and data for the design and evaluation of employment policies will further enrich the program. This section is organized within the framework of the “Youth Employment PartnerSHIP project (https://yepartnership.carloalberto.org/) and will host a speech by Fabio Rapiti (National Statistical Office).
The workshop will host papers and posters presentations, split evenly on the two thematic sections.
Submissions by young researchers are particularly welcome. A 500 Euro prize in the name of Riccardo Revelli – a pioneer in the use of administrative data for labor market analysis – will be awarded to the best contribution (either poster or paper) by a young researcher.
Please submit extended abstracts or – preferably – full papers in pdf format to labor@laboratoriorevelli.it by December 31, 2021 indicating which thematic session you are applying for and if you prefer a paper or poster presentation; in case of overcrowding of accepted paper presentations, some will be randomly assigned to the poster session. Notifications about acceptance will be sent by early January, 2022. Participation is free of charge while travel expenses will not be covered.
The workshop will take place at Collegio Carlo Alberto, Torino. An on-line channel will be open for those not able to attend in presence.

Call for Section 1, 24 February 2022, afternoon


Technological change in the workplace during the Fourth Industrial Revolution

The past few years have witnessed the rise in the development and adoption by firms of 4IR-related technologies, which include, among others, artificial intelligence, automation, and machine learning. The potential effects of these technologies on the economy and society are huge, and the labor market is likely to be particularly affected. 4IR-related technologies promise to drastically change the firms’ production processes as well as the organization of human resources within firms. While academic interest on these topics is increasing, relatively few studies have investigated the labor market consequences of 4IR technologies up to now from a firm-level or worker-level perspective. The use of firm-level, worker-level and linked employeremployee data offers unmatched opportunities to study the dynamics of technological change in the workplace, and allows answering important research questions. What is the impact of 4IR-related technologies on wages and employment? Are wages and employment outcomes different for low- and high-skilled workers and routine and non-routine jobs? How do rent-sharing dynamics differ across these types of jobs? In other words, is wage inequality increasing as the 4IR paradigm becomes more pervasive?


We welcome paper proposals on the relationships between 4IR and, among the others:

  • wages and performance outcomes
  • industrial relations
  • other labor market institutions, including (but not limited to) employment protection
  • the consequences on the excluded, with a focus on long-term unemployment


Call for Section 2, 25 February 2022, afternoon


Health and inequality


Health inequality is the difference in health between different groups of people. It can include differences in life expectancy, differences in getting a particular disease or functional limitation, and differences in recovering due to unequal access to good quality care. These differences are the result of multiple mechanisms and factors, among which the inequalities in material and immaterial resources and opportunities that stem from the labor market play a crucial role. Disparities in education, income, employment protection, job quality and satisfaction, physical and psychological conditions, are just few of the many dimensions that can be related to unequal health. At a time when income and health inequalities across the world are widespread and often increasing, even due to the pandemic, the 2nd LABOR Workshop provides a forum where evidence relevant to the measurement and analysis of the relationship between inequalities that originate in the labor market and health – or viceversa - can be discussed and shared.
We welcome research based on sound empirical evidence, identification of causal relations and grounded in economics, social epidemiology, public health and health system studies and/or related areas and disciplines.
A non-exhaustive list of themes the workshop welcomes is:

  • Inequalities in the labor market and health: from work to health and back
  • COVID-19 and the new and old inequalities
  • Digitalization, robotization and health and inequality
  • The implication of longevity inequality for the equity of pension systems